Answered By: Erin Hvizdak
Last Updated: Jun 21, 2016     Views: 119

Here are four ways to make a more powerful query in Search It:
 
Searching for a Phrase
 
To search for a phrase, type quotation marks around the phrase. You can combine both words and phrases in your search.
*If you do not enclose the phrase with quotation marks, the system will find items that contain the individual words in the phrase, regardless of whether these words are located next to each other in the order specified.
For example, to search for global warming as one term, type the following in the search box:
 
 

 
Searching for Any Specified Words or Phrases
 
You can search for items that contain at least one of the words or phrases you type in the Search box. To do so, type OR between the words or phrases.
*If you search for words or phrases without specifying OR or NOT, Search It assumes that you are searching for all the specified words or phrases.
For example, to search for items with the word Irish or the word Celtic, type the following in the search box:
*To use Boolean operators (AND, OR, NOT) within search phrases, you must enter them in uppercase letters. Otherwise, Search It removes them and performs a simple search that includes all search phrases.
Excluding Words or Phrases
You can exclude items that contain specific words or phrases. To do so, type NOT and then type the word or phrase to exclude.
*If you search for words or phrases without specifying OR or NOT, Search It assumes that you are searching for all the specified words or phrases.
For example, to search for items with the word Celtic and exclude any of these items with the word Irish, type the following in the search box:

 
Searching Using Wildcard Characters
 
You can include the following wildcard characters in your searches:
*
?—enter a question mark to perform a single character wildcard search. For example, type wom?n to search for records that contain the strings woman, women, and so forth.
*
*—enter and asterisk to perform a multiple character wildcard search. For example, type cultur* to search for records that contain strings, such as culture, cultural, and culturally.
*The system ignores wildcard characters placed at the beginning of search terms. For example, the system treats the search terms ?aying and *aying as if you had searched for aying.
Grouping Terms Within A Query
You can use parentheses to group terms within a query. For example, to search for Shakespeare and either tragedy or sonnet, type the following in the search box:

 
Selecting Your Search Scope
 
The search scope defines where the system should perform the search. A default search scope is predefined based on your login, usually corresponding to your major field of study or some other criteria set up by the institution. However, you can change the scope of your search by selecting a search scope from the drop-down list as shown in the following example.

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